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QuintilesIMS Blog

Fresh ideas and insights from our experts around the globe

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Brazilians flock to pharmacies: How healthcare companies can bolster sales by embracing this shifting shopper trend
Ingrid Martin
Six Sigma, originally developed at Motorola in the mid-1980s , aims to improve quality and efficiency of processes by reducing variability and error. Adding in the principles of lean manufacturing has created Lean Six Sigma, which has a focus on eliminating waste as a way to improve outcomes. So – what does Lean Six Sigma have to do with health? While it was developed as a manufacturing tool, Lean Six Sigma can be applied to many areas that deliver services through standardized processes. This includes the NHS, which can be likened to a production line, where patients enter the system at one 'end', receive treatment (whether acute or chronic) and are then discharged at the other. Lean Six Sigma: Capabilities in change management At Quintiles, we define Lean Six Sigma as change...
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John Doyle
(This is the fourth in 10-part blog series on industry trends that are shaping the future of healthcare. To see a report on all ten trends click here ) At Quintiles we have long been committed to the idea that the best approach to gaining efficiencies and solving problems is by working in strategic partnerships with other industry leaders. Through these partnerships all of the players bring a unique set of skills, knowledge and resources to the table to the mutual benefit of us all. This approach is now being embraced across the U.S. healthcare system, as the overarching principles of interoperability become an important factor in the way we develop and share information and best practices. As the health care system transforms to one shaped by shared goals the need for enhanced...
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PaulSutton
Oncology is a growing area, with new breakthroughs being made and innovative cancer therapeutics reaching the market. However, there are still barriers to market access, which could be overcome by the use of local data. The patients In 2009, there were around two million cancer survivors in the UK. As the UK population grows and ages, and as the survival rate for cancer improves, these numbers are expected to grow at around a million per decade, rising to around 5.3 million in 2040 1 . Source: Maddams et al . 1 This growth rate is expected to be higher in older patients and in the longest survivors, but overall is likely to slow down 1 . Amongst cancer survivors, around one in four are living with the after effects of cancer treatment, including poor health and...
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John Doyle
The paramount benefit of personalized medicine is improved survival among patients suffering from life-threatening diseases. This is great news for patients, but as these once deadly diseases become chronic conditions, it has the knock-on effect of driving increased medical and related costs for those patients. As longevity increases and retirement ages rise, the value of cost-effectively managing survivorship skyrockets. In the world of oncology, for example, breakthrough therapies are extending survival for many tumor types that were once considered a short-term death sentence, such as melanoma. Phasing out acute treatment paradigms, “maintenance therapy” is now being promulgated in many cancers such as lymphomas and leukemias. This maintenance therapy is a huge step forward from a...
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Jean Paty
If you’ve attended a biopharma conference or industry meeting in the past 18 months you’ve probably heard companies touting the fact that they are “patient-centered.” In this increasingly patient-driven healthcare economy we all want to be patient centered – even more so as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) embraces its “ Patient-Focused Drug Development Initiative ,” an effort to get patients, patient advocates and patient communities more involved in the regulatory process. But for a lot of people “patient-centered” has become one of those phrases, like “people person” or “all natural.” It sounds good, but it doesn’t hold a lot of substance unless companies implement real changes that actually incorporate the patient’s voice into the entire lifecycle for their products – from...
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John Doyle
Personalized medicine is an exciting new trend that promises to change the way we identify and treat diseases. Improved effectiveness, efficiency and access to diagnostic testing is driving sensitive and specific identification of disease, which in turn provides a deeper understanding of phenotype and genotype differences. This increase in precision is allowing healthcare stakeholders to stratify populations more finely and inform patients more accurately about their personal disease diagnosis and prognosis. Life sciences companies are leading the personalized medicine trend, though payers are equally excited about these innovations as they promise to eliminate waste from the treatment process. Payers generally advocate accurate and reliable testing with positive predictive value...
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DeanSummerfield
In today’s healthcare market, generating the greatest return on investment from a commercialization effort is increasingly complex but as vital as ever to both short-term profitability and long-term portfolio success. But achieving increased value isn’t as simple as cutting incremental costs and overhead. If companies want to effectively predict returns and maximize profitability, they need to think more strategically about their commercialization strategies , and be willing to analyze results and adapt their approach accordingly. One way to do this is to factor the following measures into every commercialization plan in order to determine the best possible allocation of resources. Strategic value Strategic value uses analytics to assess the potential outcome resulting...
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John Doyle
The healthcare industry’s steady move to evidence-based medicine is good news for all of its stakeholders. As the system shifts from rewarding volume to value, it will drive improvements in health outcomes and maximize the return on innovation. We’ve already seen many positive developments resulting from this transition such as increased transparency of quality and cost of care; as I look to the future I see a number of related trends emerging that promise to further shape the future of healthcare. The first, and arguably most noteworthy, is the rising tide of healthcare consumerism. Patients are the new customer Consumers are no longer willing to be passive recipients of healthcare services. The increased access to healthcare information coupled with the growing burden of...
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John Procter
However successful a drug is in clinical trials, one of the biggest challenges for treatment is once it reaches the patients' or caregivers' hands. The effectiveness of a treatment, and its safety, depends on patient adherence and persistence – taking the right dose in the right way at the right time, and continuing to do so, whilst storing the drug in the right conditions. Non-adherence has a major impact on the healthcare economy, from patient outcomes and treatment costs to wasted drugs. By supporting patients through education and technology, and empowering them to make the right decisions, biopharma can help to improve adherence and ensure patients and the healthcare system get the full value of the treatment. The importance of adherence: The financial and social impact ...
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Peter Rutherford
In June 2015, Quintiles Integrated Market Access team members, along with voluntary and patient organization leads, representatives from charities, NGOs and the pharma industry, senior clinical and commercial NHS leaders, healthcare professional body representatives and politicians from all parties, were invited to take part in an informal 2020health post-election reception. This was hosted by Bernard Jenkin MP at the House of Commons and addressed by Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England. Stevens took this opportunity, the first in front of this type of audience following the election, to offer an insight into NHS England strategy and delivery and talk about three Ps – the pride of staff working in NHS England, the pressures facing healthcare, and the possibilities that exist to...
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