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QuintilesIMS Blog

Fresh ideas and insights from our experts around the globe

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Brazilians flock to pharmacies: How healthcare companies can bolster sales by embracing this shifting shopper trend
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Olga Uspenskaya-Cadoz
Tau imaging and predictive analytics take center stage at the annual event held by the Alzheimer’s Association.
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Deep Patel
The growing need to treat and prevent AD is spurring new research, but healthcare industry stakeholders need to work collaboratively if we are going to successfully bring groundbreaking treatments to market.
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Olga Uspenskaya-Cadoz
Olga Uspenskaya-Cadoz
Lessons learned from previous trials are supporting the next generation of Alzheimer's research.
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Olga Uspenskaya-Cadoz
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) continues to have a devastating toll around the world. Worldwide, approximately 44 million  people have dementia, AD being its most frequent cause. Yet only one-in-four people with the disease have been correctly diagnosed. This is large part due to the fact that until relatively recently, the diagnosis of probable AD could be established only at dementia stage , whereas the definite diagnosis could be certified only by post-mortem brain examination. This lack of diagnosis meant patients with AD couldn’t begin to be treated until after they show noticeable signs of dementia, and even then a “probable diagnosis” of AD could only be concluded after all other potential causes of dementia were eliminated. This created a significant barrier to research, as drugs...
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LynnHughes
Despite decades of research, Alzheimer’s Disease continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the world today. According to data from the Alzheimer’s Association , one in three seniors in the United States dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia related illness. Worldwide the number of people exhibiting dementia is forecast to rise to 131.5 million by 2050, and roughly 43 percent of these cases will require levels of care equivalent to that provided by nursing homes. And even though we have been aware of this disease for more than 100 years, we still cannot prevent it, cure it, or even slow it down. As we recognize World Alzheimer’s Day, it is important to acknowledge these stark statistics, though it is equally important to acknowledge the progress that we have made....
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LynnHughes
Alzheimer’s Disease is becoming a global healthcare crisis. By 2050, the number of people exhibiting dementia worldwide is forecast to rise to 115.4 million , and roughly 43% of AD cases will require levels of care equivalent to that provided by nursing homes. In 2010, caring for dementia patients cost $604 billion worldwide, and the number will continue to grow as populations age. But a new global initiative , sponsored by the G7 and chaired by UK Prime Minister David Cameron, aims to turn those numbers around. This ground-breaking research program, developed by the European Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EPAD), plans to draw thousands of patients from across the European Union who at risk for early Alzheimer’s, and funnel them into an adaptive trial where multiple...
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LynnHughes
By 2015, dementia caused by Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) will affect one in every 85 people worldwide. The financial and emotional impact of this condition is staggering to both patients and their families, and new treatments are desperately needed to help arrest this trend. If interventions were available to delay both disease onset and progression by just one year, there would be almost  9.2 million fewer cases of AD in 2050 .  Biopharmaceutical companies around the world are racing to develop therapies that will slow or even stop the progression of AD. But the lack of accessibility to trial participants is frustrating their progress.  Ideally, AD clinical research programs identify patients at an early stage of their disease in the hope of influencing its course using...
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