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QuintilesIMS Blog

Fresh ideas and insights from our experts around the globe

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Brazilians flock to pharmacies: How healthcare companies can bolster sales by embracing this shifting shopper trend
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Barbara Gillespie
A follow-up report on the CardioVascular Clinical Trialists Forum, and the opportunities to enhance collaboration between cardiologists, endocrinologists, and nephrologists for the benefit of patients with chronic kidney disease.
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Barbara Gillespie
This year’s CVCT forum is dedicating a session towards understanding the evidence gaps for CV drugs in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.
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Allen Kindman
How recent advances in cardiovascular disease treatment could change the way we approach heart patient care.
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Michelle Krausz
Melanie Blackwood
How this global heart disease registry is providing key insights into global Atrial Fibrillation patient journey, and demonstrating the power of registries to change the care paradigm.
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Rick Turner
Biopharmaceutical medicines bring tremendous benefit to millions of patients worldwide. However, it is an unfortunate but immutable fact that no biologically active drug is free from the possibility of causing adverse reactions in certain individuals who are genetically and/or environmentally susceptible. Drugs for cardiac diseases or conditions of clinical concern are expected to affect the heart, having a mechanism of action that brings therapeutic benefit via advantageous changes to a patient’s biology and physiology. Drugs for all other diseases, i.e., non-cardiac drugs, are not intended to affect the heart, but it is extremely important that appropriate investigations are conducted during its development to ensure that a new drug will not have an unacceptable risk of cardiac side...
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Rick Turner
High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is an enormous medical problem in the United States and around the world, likely impacting directly or through family members virtually everyone we interact with on a daily basis.  Its reach is staggering; affecting about 70 million adults in the United States (that’s one in every three adults), and about 1 billion people worldwide.  It is a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes, heart failure, and death, and associated healthcare costs run close to $50 billion each year in the United States alone.  Despite the multitude of available drugs proven to lower blood pressure successfully when used properly, the elevated blood pressure of roughly half of affected people in the US is still not considered well controlled.  There are...
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John Lee
Yesterday was World Heart Day, a global event that provides us all with an opportunity to celebrate the incredible progress we’ve made in fighting cardiovascular diseases (CVD) worldwide.  Yet it is equally important that we take this opportunity to reflect on the challenges we still face together in discovering and developing new therapies that will lessen its impact on the global population.  Although some have argued that with the novel anticoagulants, PCSK9s, and Entresto entering the space recently, there may be less opportunity for significant innovation in the CVD, I would argue that just the opposite is true. CVD remains the number one killer the world, with 17.3 million deaths per year attributed to CVD, according to the World Heart Federation . To put that number in...
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Li-Jung-Tai
For 30 years, statins have been the most effective lipid-lowering medication and the only class of drug that improves cardiovascular mortality in randomized trials. However, despite intensive LDL reduction, a portion of patients taking statins still experience cardiovascular events. Many other patients experience side effects with statins, or the drugs do not effectively bring their LDL to goal.  But soon, we may have another option. In June, results from the 10 year IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) were published , showing ezetimibe in combination with simvastatin decreases more cardiovascular events than simvastatin alone in a high-risk population. Although the reduction is small, this is the first time that a non-statin agent...
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