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QuintilesIMS Blog

Fresh ideas and insights from our experts around the globe

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Brazilians flock to pharmacies: How healthcare companies can bolster sales by embracing this shifting shopper trend
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David Cameron
DeanSummerfield
Bringing a new drug to market in the EU can push some biopharmaceutical companies to the limits of their marketing capabilities. Market entry, commercialization, and adoption strategies vary dramatically among member countries and market strategies need to be adapted to suit the culture, language, regulations, and healthcare industry for every country and regulatory body. This can be challenging for companies accustomed to taking a single-market strategy approach or those unaccustomed to launching new therapies in the EU. Success in the EU requires biopharmaceutical companies to have a central broad-ranging value proposition for the product that is tailored to the specificities of each healthcare system so that it resonates with multiple audiences and is deployed in a way that is...
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John Doyle
(This is the eighth in a 10-part blog series on industry trends that are shaping the future of healthcare. To see a report on all ten trends click here ) Despite the very thorough and regulated processes used to dictate care pathways in our healthcare system, there exists a troubling gap in the process, where patients can easily fall through the cracks. In the hospital, staff are focused on using evidence-based checklists, treatment guidelines and care pathways to enhance efficiency during the inpatient stay and improved outcomes at time of discharge. Concurrently, physician practices are focused on coordinating and streamlining care across the outpatient setting. This “protocolization” of care is a positive development being spurred by health system payment reform that is...
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John Doyle
(This is the fifth in 10-part blog series on industry trends that are shaping the future of healthcare. To see a report on all ten trends click here ) The steady march of organizational change across the healthcare landscape is blurring the lines between payers and providers -- and in many ways that is a good thing. The greater interaction between these two key stakeholder groups is helping to close many gaps in the care process, enhance quality of care, and streamline the delivery of treatment to patients in need. Healthcare providers are becoming increasingly integrated, both vertically as hospitals and occasionally some payers acquire physician practices; and horizontally as physicians implement strategic partnerships to form multi-specialty practices. We see these integrated...
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John Doyle
(This is the fourth in 10-part blog series on industry trends that are shaping the future of healthcare. To see a report on all ten trends click here ) At Quintiles we have long been committed to the idea that the best approach to gaining efficiencies and solving problems is by working in strategic partnerships with other industry leaders. Through these partnerships all of the players bring a unique set of skills, knowledge and resources to the table to the mutual benefit of us all. This approach is now being embraced across the U.S. healthcare system, as the overarching principles of interoperability become an important factor in the way we develop and share information and best practices. As the health care system transforms to one shaped by shared goals the need for enhanced...
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DeanSummerfield
In preparing to enter new markets, biopharmaceutical companies must be increasingly rigorous in assessing accessibility at a sub-national level in addition to the national approaches that are standard practice. Given its strong influence on update and product success, accessibility should be viewed as essentially an ‘off / on’ metric that defines whether geographies for market access and sales and marketing activities are aligned. There is little value in a middle-ground of partial alignment, which results in slow or very limited product adoption, so this step is a crucial element in any strategic commercialization strategy. When implemented well, such an accessibility assessment provides companies with the flexibility to rapidly unlock a market for new indications and brands, and...
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Nathalie Horowicz-Mehler
In today’s value driven healthcare environment, the final hurdle for any drug to thrive is no longer regulatory approval — it is now payer support. Even if a drug receives marketing authorization, if payers won’t reimburse for the drug, than doctors won’t prescribe it and patients won’t use it. We’ve seen many examples over the years of good drugs with suboptimal access to patients because payers didn’t get behind them. But it doesn’t have to happen.  Early engagement strategies can help biopharma companies identify and dissipate the concerns payers may have about a new treatment option long before they come to market, thus improving the odds of their success. Payers want this kind of engagement, and the biopharma companies that incorporate interaction with them early in the...
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Michael Klein
Conducting clinical research in Africa can be fraught with risk. From overcoming basic infrastructure obstacles and finding reliable talent, to addressing personal safety issues for your team, these projects require an entirely different level of management and oversight. But Africa also offers tremendous opportunities for biopharmaceutical companies interested in doing research into a wide range of prevalent and neglected diseases, including Malaria, HIV, Tuberculosis and sickle cell anemia. Over the last eight years, global funding for neglected diseases has grown substantially, reaching $3.165 billion in 2012, and much of this research is being done in Africa.  Biopharma companies who want to participate in these philanthropic endeavors need to overcome their fears about working...
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Michael Klein
Conducting clinical research in Africa can be fraught with risk. From overcoming basic infrastructure obstacles and finding reliable talent, to addressing personal safety issues for your team, these projects require an entirely different level of management and oversight. But Africa also offers tremendous opportunities for biopharmaceutical companies interested in doing research into a wide range of prevalent and neglected diseases, including Malaria, HIV, Tuberculosis and sickle cell anemia. Over the last eight years, global funding for neglected diseases has grown substantially, reaching $3.165 billion in 2012, and much of this research is being done in Africa.  Biopharma companies who want to participate in these philanthropic endeavors need to overcome their fears about...
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BrianKelly
Economic pressures are changing the face of the healthcare industry. Along with proving that a new treatment options is safe and effective, biopharmaceutical companies also have to show that it is fiscally attractive to patients, providers and payers. If they fail to meet this cost/value benefit equation, payers won’t cover it and providers won’t subscribe it because patients won’t be able to afford it.  We are already seeing this trend in many counties, where medications are only paid for when their relative value is proven to be worth the price. And the same is beginning to occur in the U.S. as biopharma companies struggle to prove the economic benefits of their drugs.  To do this, biopharma companies must factor fiscal considerations of target populations into the business...
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